46 stories
·
3 followers

E Scooters

3 Comments and 5 Shares
Obviously battery technology and prices have driven a lot of the scooter explosion, but I feel like Dean Kamen must be at least a little grumpy about how much people laughed at the idea of the Segway.
Read the whole story
jheiss
62 days ago
reply
People mostly laughed at Segway because it was 5 grand.
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
alt_text_bot
64 days ago
reply
Obviously battery technology and prices have driven a lot of the scooter explosion, but I feel like Dean Kamen must be at least a little grumpy about how much people laughed at the idea of the Segway.
alexjurkiewicz
64 days ago
i missed you so much, alt_text_bot
Cthulhux
64 days ago
I wonder what happened to the other alt_text_bot.
dlowe
64 days ago
It fell in alt text bot thunderdome.
alexpbrown
64 days ago
alt_text_bot battle http://giant.gfycat.com/TenderPettyChimpanzee.gif
toastmonster
63 days ago
You shall not parse!

Mashable: ‘Amazon Bought Eero for $97 Million and Employees Still Got Screwed’

1 Comment and 2 Shares

Rachel Kraus, writing for Mashable:

When Amazon announced a deal to acquire Eero, the maker of a groundbreaking WiFi system, it sounded like a classic Silicon Valley success story: a promising startup is acquired by the biggest bidder in the land, and everyone rolls around in cash. But that is not this story. This story is about investors losing tens of millions of dollars and dozens of employees left with meaningless stock.

According to confidential documents viewed by Mashable, Amazon acquired Eero for $97 million. Eero executives brought home multi-million dollar bonuses and eight-figure salary increases. Everyone else, however, didn’t fare quite so well. Investors took major hits, and the Amazon acquisition rendered Eero stock worthless: $0.03 per share, down from a common stock high of $3.54 in July 2017. It typically would have cost around $3 for employees to exercise their stock, meaning they would actually lose money if they tried to cash out.

Such a great product, but home networking is a brutal market to crack.

Read the whole story
jheiss
191 days ago
reply
That's your take? "Home networking is a brutal market to crack." How about hiring good engineers is brutal, and pissing off the ones you just acqui-hired is incredibly stupid? Surely there's more to this story?
Share this story
Delete

Peter Berg on Apple Card

1 Comment

Good thread on Twitter from Peter Berg, who knows the credit card world. In short, it’s a good credit card, but the rewards aren’t great. And the most innovative aspect — paying cash back with Apple Cash — is arguably a bigger benefit to Apple than to customers.

Read the whole story
jheiss
203 days ago
reply
The rewards aren't even good. 2% cash or 3% points/miles on all purchases cards are readily available. (Citi Double Cash, Fidelity, Chase Freedom Unlimited)
WebWrangler
202 days ago
Agree. How is it better than my Costco card which I have hooked up to Apple Pay already?
Share this story
Delete

★ Very Brief Thoughts and Observations on Today’s ‘Show Time’ Apple Event

1 Comment
  • Apple Card: Sounds good, but “low interest rate” is just words. I’d like to see the actual numbers. Kind of interesting that you get 2% cash back on Apple Pay purchases and only 1% when you use the actual card.

  • Apple News Plus: Are magazines still a thing? Didn’t Apple go down this same path with Newsstand back when the iPad first launched? What’s the point of doing “magazines” if the articles you see in the News app are pulled from various publications? $10/month is good, but keep in mind that you don’t get the full Wall Street Journal at that price.

  • Apple Arcade: This was the most cohesive announcement of the day. Easy to understand what it is, why you’d want it, and what the value proposition is. It looks like Apple is spending a fortune funding these exclusive games. I think this is going to be a big hit, and it makes Google’s “we’ve got games running on our servers” thing from last week look a bit silly. Most interesting to me is how much Apple emphasized the Mac and Apple TV.

  • Apple TV Channels and TV Plus: This whole thing was… weird. I get what Channels is — the infamous “skinny bundle” that Eddy Cue has been trying to put together for years. Paying only for the channels you want is the right way to do this, but obviously a nightmare to negotiate with the actual networks and channels. It’s also coming to Roku and Amazon FireTV, which I understand but feels so strange.

    The whole TV Plus segment felt like a presentation from another company, like Google or Amazon, not Apple. Apple does a good job keeping events moving along, and they tend not to parade a long series of people on stage. This was a parade of a bunch of A-list celebrities — Spielberg! Oprah! — but it just went on and on. And why weren’t there trailers for these TV shows? Why don’t we know what this is going to cost yet? We started the day with a lot of unanswered questions about Apple’s original content strategy and we’re ending the day with most of those questions still unanswered.

Read the whole story
jheiss
203 days ago
reply
As someone who semi-seriously dabbles in the credit card game the Apple Card is terrible. If my rate of Apple Pay to not-Apple Pay transactions is anywhere close to average this is something like a 1.1% cash back card, which is just terrible. I assume they'll get a decent number of signups because "Apple", but nobody should get or use this card.

The News bundle seems like a step in the right direction, although I wish Apple was passing along more of the to the content providers. I'd love to give the New Yorker and the LA Times some money, but I can't justify their usual $10-$20 a month subscriptions. So if this lets me read their content occasionally with somewhat less guilt that's good.
Share this story
Delete

The Evidence Mounts: Uber/Lyft Are Bad for Our Cities

1 Comment and 2 Shares

At Streetsblog, Angie Schmitt has compiled a handy list of all the ways in which ride sharing services like Uber and Lyft are having significant negative effects on our cities, the environment, and our health.

Uber and Lyft are just crushing transit service in the U.S. A recent study estimated, for example, they had reduced bus ridership in San Francisco, for example, 12 percent since 2010 — or about 1.7 percent annually. And each year the services are offered, the effect grows, researcher Gregory Erhardt found.

Every person lured from a bus or a train into a Lyft or Uber adds congestion to the streets and emissions to the air. Even in cities that have made tremendous investments in transit — like Seattle which is investing another $50 billion in light rail — Uber and Lyft ridership recently surpassed light rail ridership.

Transit agencies simply cannot complete with private chauffeur service which is subsidized at below real costs by venture capitalists.

Uber and Lyft (and their investors) clearly aren’t going to stop…it’s up to cities and communities to take action. They can’t just let these companies ruin their transit until ride sharing is the only thing left.

Tags: Angie Schmitt   cities   Lyft   Uber
Read the whole story
jheiss
245 days ago
reply
And yet NYC has record transit ridership and overcrowding? I think the story is a bit more complicated.
jtthackery
245 days ago
Definitely not record ridership in NYC, numbers peaked a few years ago and are now in decline: http://web.mta.info/nyct/facts/ridership/ and https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-city/nyc-buses-get-failing-grades-amid-transit-crisis. The causes are complicated (more cars on the street increases traffic, making buses slower, making Lyft/Uber more attractive, maintenance is abysmal, etc) but the outcome is fairly clear.
steingart
240 days ago
agreed with jheiss: this assumes that mass transit goes where people want to go. SF/Seattle are awful. NY people take the subway less because it's demonstrably less pleasant. Luber might be hastening things, but if a 2.75 subway fare can't beat out a ride that's at least $10 for teh same distance, something is wrong with the subway.
Share this story
Delete

Time lapse video of an ice jam forming on the Ausable river

1 Comment

Cold is slow to worsen. Then it's fast.

A large ice jam formed and released on the Ausable River at Au Sable Forks, NY on January 12, 2018. The ice jam was caused by a combination of rapid snow melt with moderate rain in abnormally warm temperatures. The gauge peaked at 13.27 ft and the gauge data showed that the river rose exactly 7.75 ft in 14 minutes during the peak rise meaning the river rose at just over half a foot a minute at that time.

Read the whole story
jheiss
249 days ago
reply
Since I had to look it up: period to step forward one frame and comma to step backwards one frame. The interesting stuff happens in just a few frames, although I can't really tell what actually happened other than wow does that river rise quickly.
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories