48 stories
·
3 followers

[Sponsor] 1Password

1 Comment

1Password is a powerful password manager trusted by the world’s leading companies. Protect your data, fortify your defenses, and empower your employees to make better security decisions.

1Password keeps your business safe online by securing passwords and other important information. Fill passwords and credit card details with a single click — they sync automatically between your devices and can be shared immediately with select colleagues. Once 1Password is part of your employees’ workflow, good security habits become second nature.

1Password Business gives you the power to create security policies, reduce threats, and monitor your team’s access. When everyone uses 1Password, your risk goes down and productivity goes up.

Read the whole story
jheiss
20 days ago
reply
That didn't take long
Share this story
Delete

Nirmal Purja summits all 14 of the world’s 8,000-meter peaks in just six months

1 Comment

Nepalese climber Nirmal Purja

This is just a bit insane. A few days ago, Nepalese climber Nirmal Purja “reached the summit of 26,335-foot Shishapangmain Tibet, finishing a season that saw him summit all 14 of the world’s 8,000-meter peaks in just six months and seven days.

Previous record? South Korean Kim Chang-Ho back in 2013, finishing in… just under 8 years!! That’s right, he beat the record by seven and a half years! As part of his Project Possible 14/7, he was also the first to reach the summits of Mount Everest, Lhotse and Makalu within 48 hours.

Over the course of those climbs, Purja and his team also took the time to save a few people, climbed K2 when “heavy snowfall forced most of the teams on K2 to abandon their attempts,” and got a special permit from the Chinese authorities to climb Shishapangma.

Project Possible consisted of three phases. During the first, Purja climbed Annapurna, Dhaulagiri, Kanchenjunga, Everest, Lhotse, andMakalu over the course of 30 daysin April and May. On Annapurna, he and his team fixed the ropes to the summit. On their descent, they learned that Malaysian climber Wui Kin Chin was in distress and alone above 7,500 meters. Purja organized the rescue and helped get Chin off the mountain (Chin died five days later).

While descending Kanchenjunga, the world’s third highest peak, Purja’s team found three climbers who’d run out of oxygen. The team gave up their own supply and helped the men down. To finish off phase one, Purja climbed Everest, Lhotse, and Makalu in under 48 hours. He tagged Everest and Lhotse in the same day, despite waiting in line for hours en route toEverest’s summit. That delay gave him time to snap the most viral photo of the Everest season.

Tags: climbing
Read the whole story
jheiss
34 days ago
reply
"the most viral photo of the Everest season" with no link!?
wittigad
34 days ago
https://www.outsideonline.com/2397164/everest-summit-traffic-jam
Share this story
Delete

E Scooters

3 Comments and 5 Shares
Obviously battery technology and prices have driven a lot of the scooter explosion, but I feel like Dean Kamen must be at least a little grumpy about how much people laughed at the idea of the Segway.
Read the whole story
jheiss
117 days ago
reply
People mostly laughed at Segway because it was 5 grand.
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
alt_text_bot
120 days ago
reply
Obviously battery technology and prices have driven a lot of the scooter explosion, but I feel like Dean Kamen must be at least a little grumpy about how much people laughed at the idea of the Segway.
alexjurkiewicz
120 days ago
i missed you so much, alt_text_bot
Cthulhux
119 days ago
I wonder what happened to the other alt_text_bot.
dlowe
119 days ago
It fell in alt text bot thunderdome.
alexpbrown
119 days ago
alt_text_bot battle http://giant.gfycat.com/TenderPettyChimpanzee.gif
toastmonster
118 days ago
You shall not parse!

Mashable: ‘Amazon Bought Eero for $97 Million and Employees Still Got Screwed’

1 Comment and 2 Shares

Rachel Kraus, writing for Mashable:

When Amazon announced a deal to acquire Eero, the maker of a groundbreaking WiFi system, it sounded like a classic Silicon Valley success story: a promising startup is acquired by the biggest bidder in the land, and everyone rolls around in cash. But that is not this story. This story is about investors losing tens of millions of dollars and dozens of employees left with meaningless stock.

According to confidential documents viewed by Mashable, Amazon acquired Eero for $97 million. Eero executives brought home multi-million dollar bonuses and eight-figure salary increases. Everyone else, however, didn’t fare quite so well. Investors took major hits, and the Amazon acquisition rendered Eero stock worthless: $0.03 per share, down from a common stock high of $3.54 in July 2017. It typically would have cost around $3 for employees to exercise their stock, meaning they would actually lose money if they tried to cash out.

Such a great product, but home networking is a brutal market to crack.

Read the whole story
jheiss
246 days ago
reply
That's your take? "Home networking is a brutal market to crack." How about hiring good engineers is brutal, and pissing off the ones you just acqui-hired is incredibly stupid? Surely there's more to this story?
Share this story
Delete

Peter Berg on Apple Card

1 Comment

Good thread on Twitter from Peter Berg, who knows the credit card world. In short, it’s a good credit card, but the rewards aren’t great. And the most innovative aspect — paying cash back with Apple Cash — is arguably a bigger benefit to Apple than to customers.

Read the whole story
jheiss
258 days ago
reply
The rewards aren't even good. 2% cash or 3% points/miles on all purchases cards are readily available. (Citi Double Cash, Fidelity, Chase Freedom Unlimited)
WebWrangler
258 days ago
Agree. How is it better than my Costco card which I have hooked up to Apple Pay already?
Share this story
Delete

★ Very Brief Thoughts and Observations on Today’s ‘Show Time’ Apple Event

1 Comment
  • Apple Card: Sounds good, but “low interest rate” is just words. I’d like to see the actual numbers. Kind of interesting that you get 2% cash back on Apple Pay purchases and only 1% when you use the actual card.

  • Apple News Plus: Are magazines still a thing? Didn’t Apple go down this same path with Newsstand back when the iPad first launched? What’s the point of doing “magazines” if the articles you see in the News app are pulled from various publications? $10/month is good, but keep in mind that you don’t get the full Wall Street Journal at that price.

  • Apple Arcade: This was the most cohesive announcement of the day. Easy to understand what it is, why you’d want it, and what the value proposition is. It looks like Apple is spending a fortune funding these exclusive games. I think this is going to be a big hit, and it makes Google’s “we’ve got games running on our servers” thing from last week look a bit silly. Most interesting to me is how much Apple emphasized the Mac and Apple TV.

  • Apple TV Channels and TV Plus: This whole thing was… weird. I get what Channels is — the infamous “skinny bundle” that Eddy Cue has been trying to put together for years. Paying only for the channels you want is the right way to do this, but obviously a nightmare to negotiate with the actual networks and channels. It’s also coming to Roku and Amazon FireTV, which I understand but feels so strange.

    The whole TV Plus segment felt like a presentation from another company, like Google or Amazon, not Apple. Apple does a good job keeping events moving along, and they tend not to parade a long series of people on stage. This was a parade of a bunch of A-list celebrities — Spielberg! Oprah! — but it just went on and on. And why weren’t there trailers for these TV shows? Why don’t we know what this is going to cost yet? We started the day with a lot of unanswered questions about Apple’s original content strategy and we’re ending the day with most of those questions still unanswered.

Read the whole story
jheiss
258 days ago
reply
As someone who semi-seriously dabbles in the credit card game the Apple Card is terrible. If my rate of Apple Pay to not-Apple Pay transactions is anywhere close to average this is something like a 1.1% cash back card, which is just terrible. I assume they'll get a decent number of signups because "Apple", but nobody should get or use this card.

The News bundle seems like a step in the right direction, although I wish Apple was passing along more of the to the content providers. I'd love to give the New Yorker and the LA Times some money, but I can't justify their usual $10-$20 a month subscriptions. So if this lets me read their content occasionally with somewhat less guilt that's good.
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories