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Google, Throwing Stones From Its Glass House

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Ron Amadeo, in a piece for Ars headlined “After Ruining Android Messaging, Google Says iMessage Is Too Powerful”:

Even if Google could magically roll out RCS everywhere, it’s a poor standard to build a messaging platform on because it is dependent on a carrier phone bill. It’s anti-Internet and can’t natively work on webpages, PCs, smartwatches, and tablets, because those things don’t have SIM cards. The carriers designed RCS, so RCS puts your carrier bill at the center of your online identity, even when free identification methods like email exist and work on more devices. Google is just promoting carrier lock-in as a solution to Apple lock-in.

Despite Google’s complaining about iMessage, the company seems to have learned nothing from its years of messaging failure. Today, Google messaging is the worst and most fragmented it has ever been. As of press time, the company runs eight separate messaging platforms, none of which talk to each other: there is Google Messages/RCS, which is being promoted today, but there’s also Google Chat/Hangouts, Google Voice, Google Photos Messages, Google Pay Messages, Google Maps Business Messages, Google Stadia Messages, and Google Assistant Messaging. Those last couple of apps aren’t primarily messaging apps but have all ended up rolling their own siloed messaging platform because no dominant Google system exists for them to plug into.

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jheiss
8 days ago
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This
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The State of External Retina Displays

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Casey Liss:

The above is the entire lineup. That’s it. Four options. Three of which existed 1,665 days ago.

This is why Apple needs to make its own prosumer-priced external display (or even better, displays) — it’s clear no one else is making them other than LG, and the LG displays aren’t great.

Update: Yoni Mazuz points out that LG’s UltraFine 4K — the smaller one — was replaced at some point after 2017 with a slightly larger panel with lower resolution, but with faster USB ports.

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jheiss
25 days ago
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The Dell P2415Q that was in the 2017 list is still available at times via eBay. I just picked one up a few months ago to go with my MacBook Pro. It and the P2715Q are great monitors.
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Symbols

3 Comments and 9 Shares
"röntgen" and "rem" are 20th-century physics terms that mean "no trespassing."
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jheiss
120 days ago
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It's been a while since I laughed that hard at an xkcd
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2 public comments
richardfearn
119 days ago
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> eV - *definitely* don't shine that in your eye

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoli_Bugorski
UK
taddevries
119 days ago
Wow, amazing read
alt_text_bot
120 days ago
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"röntgen" and "rem" are 20th-century physics terms that mean "no trespassing."

‘Float’

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Aundre Larrow, announcing his directorial debut:

Shot on the new iPhone 13 Pro, Float is a short film about the journey that a father and daughter take together.

If this doesn’t move you, you’re not hooked up right. Good god, what a powerful, lovely, beautiful short film. Headphones and full screen — this deserves your attention. I take it back, Cinematic mode — which Larrow used to shoot this — is no gimmick at all.

This is just astonishing. Remember Aundre Larrow’s name.

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jheiss
120 days ago
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Yikes, that was more feels that I was planning to have this morning. Very well done.
sirshannon
120 days ago
Whelp. You warned me. I was warned. No one to blame but myself.
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Who Needs to Shoot Photos in Low Light Anyway?

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Nilay Patel, on Brian X. Chen’s iPhone 13 review for Pravda The New York Times:

The NYT does not believe regular people stand to benefit from better iPhone photos in the dark. I live for this review from another planet every year.

I thought this was a really strange passage too. Quoting from Chen’s review:

So in summary, the iPhone 13 cameras are slightly better than those of last year’s iPhones. Even compared with iPhones from three years ago, the cameras are much better only if you care about taking nice photos in the dark.

Just how important is night photography? I posed the question to Jim Wilson, a longtime staff photographer for The New York Times, as he was taking pictures of the new iPhones for this review. He said it would be a crucial feature for people like him, but not as important for casual shooters.

Ben Thompson recalled (as I should have, but did not) that this is something of a recurring theme. From Chen’s review of the iPhones 11 and 11 Pro two years ago:

Photos taken with the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro looked crisp and clear, and their colors were accurate. But after I finished these tests, I looked back at my archived photos taken with an iPhone X.

Those pictures, especially the ones shot with portrait mode, still looked impressive. Some of the low-light ones looked crummy in comparison with the ones taken by the iPhone 11s, but I wouldn’t recommend that you buy a new phone just to get better night photos. You could always just use flash.

You shouldn’t feel the need to buy a new iPhone every year” is a fine sentiment, one that many, if not most, reviewers make each year. Arguing, repeatedly, that your readers should not be concerned at all about taking better photos in low light is bizarre. The single biggest change in consumer photography over the last 3–4 years is the exponential improvement in low light and night mode photography on new mobile phones.

And again, as I mentioned yesterday, Chen’s iPhone 13 review doesn’t even mention battery life, even though almost every other reviewer noted significant improvements across the lineup.

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jheiss
122 days ago
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The quote from Chen doesn't say "readers should not be concerned at all", it says "I wouldn't recommend that you buy a new phone just to get better night photos." And I completely agree with that. Are better night photos good? Sure. Am I going to spend a grand to get them? Not a chance.
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Today Is September 21st

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Every year for the past several years on September 21, Demi Adejuyigbe makes a video featuring the 1978 Earth, Wind & Fire song September (which begins “Do you remember, twenty-first night of September?”) This year, for what he says is his final effort, Adejuyigbe made a whole-ass movie, complete with special effects. Gonna watch this later with my daughter, who is 12 today (and owns the t-shirt).

In tandem with the video, Adejuyigbe is raising money to benefit The West Fund (a pro-choice Texas organization), Imagine Water Works (a New Orleans organization focused on Hurricane Ida relief efforts), and The Sunrise Movement (a climate emergency advocacy group) — you can donate here.

Tags: Demi Adejuyigbe   music   video
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jheiss
123 days ago
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This was amazing
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